Busy 2016 for Yate SDMN products

Stepping into 2016, we have exciting news.

Through 2015 we continued to develop the GSM/GPRS SatSite base station, as well as our main core network products: the 2G/2.5G/4G YateUCN core network and the 2G/3G/4G YateHSS/HLR.

We start 2016 with the release of the LTE SatSite Model 142, with software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation, generating 10-20 Watts LTE power output with a power consumption of only 65-80 Watts. We also prepared new features and updates for YateHSS/HLR after receiving relevant feedback from our customers. And there is the new YateBTS website, which now offers extensive information on our products, solutions and our technology.

SatSite Model 142 launch

The LTE SatSite Model 142 delivers software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation from the same base station.

LTE_SatSite_142

In both LTE and GSM/GPRS modes, the SatSite Model 142 generates a higher output power than the previous model. As an eNodeB, the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts, at bandwidths of 1.4 to 20 MHz, while in GSM/GPRS mode the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts for 1-TRX or 2 Watts/TRX in multi-TRX configuration (at up to 4-TRX). The SatSite weighs only 5kg and has a low enough power consumption that it can be easily powered by solar panels in most of the world.

Its required backhaul is under 100 Mbit, resulting from the fact that, unlike many LTE solutions, the SatSite is a unified LTE eNodeB, and not a remote radio head (RRH) that needs a separate baseband unit (BBU).

For more information about Model 142’s complete specifications, please check the datasheet.

YateHSS/HLR new features

On the core network side, we start 2016 with new features to the YateHSS/HLR: scalability (cluster configuration), multi-IMSI support and support for separate circuit-switched/packet-switched network profiles.

Cluster configuration allows YateHSS/HLR nodes to work in a cloud to provide scalability. YateHSS/HLR servers all provide the same service and handle the same subscribers. If a server fails, the subscribers are distributed to the other YateHSS/HLR nodes in the cluster, which continues to provide the same services.

Multi-IMSI support allows YateHSS/HLR to respond to an alternative IMSI from the same SIM card, in different roaming scenarios. The feature sends an HTTP request to the operator’s server after the subscriber tries to roam into a new network. The operator’s server uses the request to trigger an IMSI change in the SIM using an OTA mechanism. The SIM carries a multi-IMSI application that ensures that the SIM will return to the main IMSI if it cannot register with the alternative IMSI.

The support for separate CS/PS profiles means that subscribers’ profiles are grouped according to the types of services associated to them, allowing the profiles to be easily updated to provide new services. For example, a subscriber might have “Prepaid voice, roaming”, “Prepaid data 1Mbps, not roaming” and “LTE not allowed” settings. It is easy to change one service of a subscriber by simply selecting another profile.

A few final words…

We have entered 2016 with great new core network features and new RAN product releases, making new opportunities for operators. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Facebook to find out first about our new  announcements and releases.

 

Modernizing GSM networks – an ever difficult feat

GSM has turned 24 this year and throughout this time showed that it is invaluable for telephone calls and M2M applications. Many industry observers estimate that 2G will continue to be in use even after 3G is discontinued. But GSM networks are confronted with the difficult task of adapting to the new operating environments.

The modernization of GSM is particularly arduous when considering that equipment vendors and solutions providers have concentrated on developing components for newer networks (3G, 4G, even 5G) and less on innovating GSM network components. The SatSite is designed to serve either GSM, LTE, or mixed GSM/LTE networks working directly with the unified core YateUCN, proving that there’s still plenty of room for innovative results for GSM deployments.

The technology behind our GSM network equipment allows new techniques like radio resource sharing with LTE, running GSM from a remote radio head, applying SON or beamforming technologies, which are typical for LTE, to be applied to 2G networks. The result is a simplified and flexible network architecture, better management and reduced costs.

Spectrum sharing
The SatSite base station is based on commodity, off-the shelf,-hardware and can be software-‘switched’ to provide either GSM, LTE, or both. When running YateBTS for GSM, it communicates directly with the unified core network, eliminating the base station controller (BSC). This architecture, where the BTS connects straight to the core network and communicates to other BTS in the network over peering protocols is very similar to the architecture of LTE.

This is also what makes it possible to support multiple technologies in the same equipment. If one BTS uses the same frequency bands to provide both GSM and LTE access, operators may choose freely on how to allocate spectrum between them. Depending on the service use at a given time, operators can assign prioritize voice over data services and vice versa. We’ve detailed spectrum sharing between GSM and LTE in the SatSite here.

Self-Organizing Network
SON techniques feature dynamic self-configuration, self-optimization, and self-healing functions, which can be achieved due to the eNodeB not being controlled by a distinct BSC component as in the typical case of GSM. Without a BSC, SatSite base stations are able to connect to each other over peering protocols, allowing an exchange of neighbor information between units. This presentation offers more details on SON technology for mixed 2G/4G networks.

Beamforming
Beamforming relies on grouping the signals of multiple antennas and into one beam sent to a desired direction. It aims to reduce interference and obtain a better quality of a service for a certain user. Unlike MIMO, where the network sends different parts of the data stream on different antennas, beamforming combines the signals from the different antennas and sends them to one device. What’s more, as opposed to MIMO, beamforming does not require any support from the handset, making it suitable for use in any mobile network technology, be it 2G, 3G, 4G or even 5G, in the future.

Benefits of optimizing GSM networks include a better management of the network resources, reduced infrastructure costs and maintenance efforts, and the flexibility to upgrade or reprogram network functions.

SS7ware @ITU Telecom World 2015

This week we’re at ITU Telecom World, the United Nations Specialized Agency for Information and Communication Technologies conference in Budapest! Let’s meet!

October 12 through 15, SS7ware Inc. team is exhibiting at stand P13, in Pavilion F. Here are the highlights for the week:

David Burgess will be representing the SME community as a panelist in this Business-to-Government dialogue.

  • Live SatSite demonstration: Wednesday, October 14, 11:00 – 12:00, stand SS7ware P13

A live demo session followed by Q&A will be organized at our stand.

The SatSite lightweight, low-power base station is simply plugged in to allow calls between GSM handsets.

  • Exhibition: Monday, October 12 – Thursday, October 15. Stop by stand P13 anytime during the exhibition:

Monday 12 October: 10:30-18:00

Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 October: 10:00-18:00

Thursday 15 October: 10:00-16:00

Follow the news on Twitter (@yate_voip), Facebook, connect to us on LinkedIn or drop us a message if you wish to meet.

GSM and LTE, 2 technologies in 1 base station

LTE for bandwidth and GSM for voice are a match made in heaven for subscribers. The roll-out however, not so much. Running them both from the same radio equipment (BTS) can be the answer. SatSite can run both YateBTS (GSM) and YateENB (LTE) at the same time, in the same spectrum, using the same radio hardware.

Software-defined BTS

This is made possible by replacing commonly used FPGA and DSP boards with one Intel Atom chipset. Both the GSM YateBTS and the LTE YateENB are modules implemented in software, allowing the base station to be reprogrammed or reconfigured to support new protocols. A base station can run GSM at first, and can be later software-upgradeable to LTE, running multiple air interface protocols using the same radio, at the same time.

Mixed 2G/4G spectrum allocation

From a spectrum point of view, as seen in the image below, the mixed GSM/LTE technology enables a base station to be software-configurable for up to 4-TRX/ARFCN. A base station can use the 850, 900, 1800, and 1900 MhZ bands for both GSM and LTE, meaning that it will allocate two ARFCN to GSM and will use the remaining spectrum for LTE.

ss_mix_spectr_2015-10-6_pic1_version1.1Based on the subscribers’ activity (data vs. voice), operators can assign in software the spectrum priority for either LTE or GSM, so LTE gets a higher priority if there is a lower use of voice services. This optimizes the resources allocation in the network and supplies better access to users.

YateBTS and YateENB – Yate modules

Yate is an underlying part of the software architecture of our mixed 2G/4G RAN. It has a highly expandable architecture that provides unified management and monitoring. Both YateBTS and YateENB are software modules based on Yate. Yate’s SDR architecture enables the LTE and the GSM modules to use the same radio hardware. You can find out more about Yate’s multiple modules here.

ss_mix_spectr_2015-10-6_pic2_version1.1Yate’s SDR architecture also enabled us to replace the conventional, special purpose equipment combination of a baseband unit (BBU) + a remote radio unit (RRU), with a single unit. With this technology we implemented all the functions of both a conventional base station and a base station controller, eliminating the costly Abis interface for traffic and signaling, as well as partial functions of an Mobile Switching Center (MSC), in terms of mobility, power and frequency management and handover.

The mixed 2G/4G RAN technology is embodied in our SatSite base station. SatSite acts more like a conventional eNodeB, even when running on GSM, because it uses IP backhaul for both 2G and 4G. It also contains the IP list of all neighboring SatSite units.

Using off-the-shelf hardware and a generic operating system, SatSite embraces everything SDR stands for, and is the solution for an easy adoption of new standards or technologies, even 5G in the future.

A snapshot of SS7ware at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas

SS7ware was at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas last week – if you haven’t been around to see us, here’s a recap of the most important events.

It was great to see so many companies, including manufacturers, mobile operators, M2M platform companies, developers, service providers, gathered to discuss innovation, management, and security in the M2M and IoT ecosystem.

Through 4 days of keynote presentations, panel discussions, exhibitor booths, live demos, and case studies, we also had a lot on our plates, as you can see in the gallery below.

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CEO Diana Cionoiu was invited to take part in the ‘Carrier Aggregation for Public Transport’ panel which took place Wednesday, discussing the possibilities to create a new experience for public transportation using the bandwidth capabilities in LTE and LTE-Advanced.

SS7ware also made it to the AT&T Fast Pitch finals, where we could talk about our software-defined mobile network solution among a variety of other innovative ideas bringing IoT to both businesses and individuals. Two interviews for the TMC team for their website, and a live SatSite demo were also on our list. Everyone around the Exhibit Hall on Tuesday had the chance to watch devices connected to SatSite work seamlessly. We simply plugged it in to make a GSM phone call between the two registered devices; all in the blink of an eye.

To wrap up, thanks to the TMC team for doing an amazing job organizing the event! Here are some take-aways to keep us focused on IoT/M2M developments in the near future:

  • when it comes to connecting the home, security is of utmost importance
  • connecting ‘everything’ comes with increased responsibility and safety challenges
  • new players like Google, Amazon, or Facebook are reshaping the ecosystem
  • who does what in the new business environment

For more content, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Meet us at IoT Evolution Expo!

Here’s your chance to meet us – we’ll be at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas, August 17 to 20! We’ll be there throughout the event showcasing a live product demo and we’re participating in the ‘Carrier Aggregation for Public Transport’ panel on Wednesday, August 19, starting at 2:30 pm.

Complete software-defined network for IoT coverage

During the panel, we’ll talk more about SatSite as an IoT solution for public transport. In cities, LTE is an exciting opportunity for connecting new business sectors and new activities. Devices and sensors using real-time data can provide more relevant contextual information to help make faster, better decisions. LTE IoT coverage can reshape the way we think and act towards our homes, healthcare, transportation, or security.

Our solution for connected transportation, LTE SatSite, enables deployments with lower costs, resilient infrastructure, and high capacity.

The lightweight, low-power base station can be easily installed in public access areas (such as buses or crossroads), allowing:

  • seamless 4G customer experience anytime
  • smart traffic and passenger management
  • emergency management and transport security

Join us at IoT Evolution Expo, tune in to our Youtube channel, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More about the speaker: follow Diana Cionoiu on LinkedIn.

IoT management at the network’s edge

IoT has enabled users to access control over a multitude of “smart” devices while also unlocking unlimited possibilities for operators in new markets, such as farming, utilities and transportation. A Gartner study claimed that by 2020 there will be around 26 billion IoT connected devices. Imagine the data they collect and the necessary technology required to process it.

Until recently, cloud computing was the answer for storing and processing data collections from IoT applications. However, despite being a cost-effective model in appearance, the handling data in a centralized cloud site is facing new capacity, data management and security challenges. Analysts at Gartner have also raised the alarm on the inefficiency, from both a technical and economical standpoint, of sending all of the gathered data to a single site for processing.

Fog Computing is a new technical solution that allows data to be aggregated in larger number of smaller remote data centers for the initial analysis, and only afterwards sent for storage into the cloud. The term “Fog Computing” is recent and refers to a technology that is an extension of cloud computing. It’s main characteristics are: the geographical distribution of a large number of processing nodes (application servers), its extended mobility, a low latency and location recognition, wireless access and the predominance of real-time applications.

Fog Computing is a virtualized layer between the IoT devices and the conventional data centers in the cloud, that delivers processing, networking and storage services. It is also known as edge computing, because it is usually located at the edge of the network. It allows for a new set of applications and services solely dedicated to routing, managing and analyzing IoT data, relieving data centers from processing and storing the large volume of measurements collected from IoT devices and sensors.

This is where our SDMN YateBTS-powered solution responds to the current needs of IoT data management. To deploy a fully functional Fog Computing ecosystem, operators can install scalable application servers distributed in each cell site for data analysis and monitoring, without the traffic cluttering the core network. They are geographically distributed and connect to each other to perform a “close to the ground” intermediary layer between IoT devices and the cloud, providing security, low latency and high resilience.

SatSite base stations can redirect the traffic locally to the application server, based on the IMSI specific to the device.

fog_computing

Main features:

  • geographical distribution – Fog Computing nodes in application servers are located in each cell site and cover a wide portion of the field.
  • large number of nodes – closely connected to the geographical distribution
  • real-time connectivity – all the Fog application servers communicate directly with the SatSites located in their proximity, ensuring that they interact with client devices without passing through the core network for each IP data session

Our simplified mobile network architecture allows an easy deployment of Fog platforms to deliver real-time analytics, localization services and resilient applications. It reduces the processing burden in cloud data centers without overcharging the core network, making it ideal solution for IoT networks.