SS7ware’s insights from the MVNOs World Congress

VNOs World Congress 2017 (1)

We just got back from the MVNOs World Congress, in Nice, where we did quite a good impression with our YateHSS/HLR and YateUCN solutions for MVNOs. The “not so shocking” conclusion that we came to was that our public pricing policy impacts the MVNO market at its core.

We already knew that, so the real benefit of the conference for us was that we got closer to the needs of our customers by talking to them about their troubles as MVNOs, MNOs and IoT MVNOs.

We share the knowledge, so here are some of the insights:

1. MVNOs need our network equipment (YateUCN as a GMSC, GGSN, PGW and YateHSS/HLR) because of the flexibility given by the features included in the Yate software and the use of off-the-shelf hardware.

In the case of the YateUCN (unified core network) the Yate software implements the functionalities of 2G/3G/4G core networks in a single server. We made it that flexible in order to ease the businesses of MVNOs and MNOs as well. YateUCN works for MNOs as MSC/VLR, SGSN, SGW.

2. full MVNOs choose our products because their businesses aren’t sustainable on the long run with big vendors’ products (such as Cisco, Huawei) that ask 4 times the costs of an YateHSS/HLR for an upgrade.

As the network grows, the CAPEX and OPEX expenditures/subscriber decreases significantly with our MVNO solutions. We charge per license and once your network grows in number of subscribers, you just add another server in a cluster. The YateUCN and YateHSS/HLR solutions are scalable, redundant and load-balanced due to the clustering module implemented in the Yate software.

3. the IoT MVNOs use our GGSN/ PGW solution (YateUCN) to offer mobility to the IoT devices and a positive return on investment for the MVNO business, within 6 months or less.
SS7ware’s full IoT MVNO network solution consists of two products, YateUCN and YateHSS/HLR, both with license costs at $31050, which is about $0.62/ device for a network of 100.000 devices.

4. the strategy of MNOs is to officially sustain MVNOs businesses, because MVNOs play well on the segmented markets and by doing this, they take market shares from competition.

Please feel free to send us questions at sales@ss7ware.com or visit our website, http://www.yatebts.com, to learn more about SS7ware’s MVNO solutions.

Hope to see you in November at the MVNO Conference in London.

SS7ware Inc.
Contact
0040-726-183-753
www.yatebts.com

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Busy 2016 for Yate SDMN products

Stepping into 2016, we have exciting news.

Through 2015 we continued to develop the GSM/GPRS SatSite base station, as well as our main core network products: the 2G/2.5G/4G YateUCN core network and the 2G/3G/4G YateHSS/HLR.

We start 2016 with the release of the LTE SatSite Model 142, with software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation, generating 10-20 Watts LTE power output with a power consumption of only 65-80 Watts. We also prepared new features and updates for YateHSS/HLR after receiving relevant feedback from our customers. And there is the new YateBTS website, which now offers extensive information on our products, solutions and our technology.

SatSite Model 142 launch

The LTE SatSite Model 142 delivers software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation from the same base station.

LTE_SatSite_142

In both LTE and GSM/GPRS modes, the SatSite Model 142 generates a higher output power than the previous model. As an eNodeB, the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts, at bandwidths of 1.4 to 20 MHz, while in GSM/GPRS mode the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts for 1-TRX or 2 Watts/TRX in multi-TRX configuration (at up to 4-TRX). The SatSite weighs only 5kg and has a low enough power consumption that it can be easily powered by solar panels in most of the world.

Its required backhaul is under 100 Mbit, resulting from the fact that, unlike many LTE solutions, the SatSite is a unified LTE eNodeB, and not a remote radio head (RRH) that needs a separate baseband unit (BBU).

For more information about Model 142’s complete specifications, please check the datasheet.

YateHSS/HLR new features

On the core network side, we start 2016 with new features to the YateHSS/HLR: scalability (cluster configuration), multi-IMSI support and support for separate circuit-switched/packet-switched network profiles.

Cluster configuration allows YateHSS/HLR nodes to work in a cloud to provide scalability. YateHSS/HLR servers all provide the same service and handle the same subscribers. If a server fails, the subscribers are distributed to the other YateHSS/HLR nodes in the cluster, which continues to provide the same services.

Multi-IMSI support allows YateHSS/HLR to respond to an alternative IMSI from the same SIM card, in different roaming scenarios. The feature sends an HTTP request to the operator’s server after the subscriber tries to roam into a new network. The operator’s server uses the request to trigger an IMSI change in the SIM using an OTA mechanism. The SIM carries a multi-IMSI application that ensures that the SIM will return to the main IMSI if it cannot register with the alternative IMSI.

The support for separate CS/PS profiles means that subscribers’ profiles are grouped according to the types of services associated to them, allowing the profiles to be easily updated to provide new services. For example, a subscriber might have “Prepaid voice, roaming”, “Prepaid data 1Mbps, not roaming” and “LTE not allowed” settings. It is easy to change one service of a subscriber by simply selecting another profile.

A few final words…

We have entered 2016 with great new core network features and new RAN product releases, making new opportunities for operators. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Facebook to find out first about our new  announcements and releases.

 

Modernizing GSM networks – an ever difficult feat

GSM has turned 24 this year and throughout this time showed that it is invaluable for telephone calls and M2M applications. Many industry observers estimate that 2G will continue to be in use even after 3G is discontinued. But GSM networks are confronted with the difficult task of adapting to the new operating environments.

The modernization of GSM is particularly arduous when considering that equipment vendors and solutions providers have concentrated on developing components for newer networks (3G, 4G, even 5G) and less on innovating GSM network components. The SatSite is designed to serve either GSM, LTE, or mixed GSM/LTE networks working directly with the unified core YateUCN, proving that there’s still plenty of room for innovative results for GSM deployments.

The technology behind our GSM network equipment allows new techniques like radio resource sharing with LTE, running GSM from a remote radio head, applying SON or beamforming technologies, which are typical for LTE, to be applied to 2G networks. The result is a simplified and flexible network architecture, better management and reduced costs.

Spectrum sharing
The SatSite base station is based on commodity, off-the shelf,-hardware and can be software-‘switched’ to provide either GSM, LTE, or both. When running YateBTS for GSM, it communicates directly with the unified core network, eliminating the base station controller (BSC). This architecture, where the BTS connects straight to the core network and communicates to other BTS in the network over peering protocols is very similar to the architecture of LTE.

This is also what makes it possible to support multiple technologies in the same equipment. If one BTS uses the same frequency bands to provide both GSM and LTE access, operators may choose freely on how to allocate spectrum between them. Depending on the service use at a given time, operators can assign prioritize voice over data services and vice versa. We’ve detailed spectrum sharing between GSM and LTE in the SatSite here.

Self-Organizing Network
SON techniques feature dynamic self-configuration, self-optimization, and self-healing functions, which can be achieved due to the eNodeB not being controlled by a distinct BSC component as in the typical case of GSM. Without a BSC, SatSite base stations are able to connect to each other over peering protocols, allowing an exchange of neighbor information between units. This presentation offers more details on SON technology for mixed 2G/4G networks.

Beamforming
Beamforming relies on grouping the signals of multiple antennas and into one beam sent to a desired direction. It aims to reduce interference and obtain a better quality of a service for a certain user. Unlike MIMO, where the network sends different parts of the data stream on different antennas, beamforming combines the signals from the different antennas and sends them to one device. What’s more, as opposed to MIMO, beamforming does not require any support from the handset, making it suitable for use in any mobile network technology, be it 2G, 3G, 4G or even 5G, in the future.

Benefits of optimizing GSM networks include a better management of the network resources, reduced infrastructure costs and maintenance efforts, and the flexibility to upgrade or reprogram network functions.

SS7ware @ITU Telecom World 2015

This week we’re at ITU Telecom World, the United Nations Specialized Agency for Information and Communication Technologies conference in Budapest! Let’s meet!

October 12 through 15, SS7ware Inc. team is exhibiting at stand P13, in Pavilion F. Here are the highlights for the week:

David Burgess will be representing the SME community as a panelist in this Business-to-Government dialogue.

  • Live SatSite demonstration: Wednesday, October 14, 11:00 – 12:00, stand SS7ware P13

A live demo session followed by Q&A will be organized at our stand.

The SatSite lightweight, low-power base station is simply plugged in to allow calls between GSM handsets.

  • Exhibition: Monday, October 12 – Thursday, October 15. Stop by stand P13 anytime during the exhibition:

Monday 12 October: 10:30-18:00

Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 October: 10:00-18:00

Thursday 15 October: 10:00-16:00

Follow the news on Twitter (@yate_voip), Facebook, connect to us on LinkedIn or drop us a message if you wish to meet.

GSM and LTE, 2 technologies in 1 base station

LTE for bandwidth and GSM for voice are a match made in heaven for subscribers. The roll-out however, not so much. Running them both from the same radio equipment (BTS) can be the answer. SatSite can run both YateBTS (GSM) and YateENB (LTE) at the same time, in the same spectrum, using the same radio hardware.

Software-defined BTS

This is made possible by replacing commonly used FPGA and DSP boards with one Intel Atom chipset. Both the GSM YateBTS and the LTE YateENB are modules implemented in software, allowing the base station to be reprogrammed or reconfigured to support new protocols. A base station can run GSM at first, and can be later software-upgradeable to LTE, running multiple air interface protocols using the same radio, at the same time.

Mixed 2G/4G spectrum allocation

From a spectrum point of view, as seen in the image below, the mixed GSM/LTE technology enables a base station to be software-configurable for up to 4-TRX/ARFCN. A base station can use the 850, 900, 1800, and 1900 MhZ bands for both GSM and LTE, meaning that it will allocate two ARFCN to GSM and will use the remaining spectrum for LTE.

ss_mix_spectr_2015-10-6_pic1_version1.1Based on the subscribers’ activity (data vs. voice), operators can assign in software the spectrum priority for either LTE or GSM, so LTE gets a higher priority if there is a lower use of voice services. This optimizes the resources allocation in the network and supplies better access to users.

YateBTS and YateENB – Yate modules

Yate is an underlying part of the software architecture of our mixed 2G/4G RAN. It has a highly expandable architecture that provides unified management and monitoring. Both YateBTS and YateENB are software modules based on Yate. Yate’s SDR architecture enables the LTE and the GSM modules to use the same radio hardware. You can find out more about Yate’s multiple modules here.

ss_mix_spectr_2015-10-6_pic2_version1.1Yate’s SDR architecture also enabled us to replace the conventional, special purpose equipment combination of a baseband unit (BBU) + a remote radio unit (RRU), with a single unit. With this technology we implemented all the functions of both a conventional base station and a base station controller, eliminating the costly Abis interface for traffic and signaling, as well as partial functions of an Mobile Switching Center (MSC), in terms of mobility, power and frequency management and handover.

The mixed 2G/4G RAN technology is embodied in our SatSite base station. SatSite acts more like a conventional eNodeB, even when running on GSM, because it uses IP backhaul for both 2G and 4G. It also contains the IP list of all neighboring SatSite units.

Using off-the-shelf hardware and a generic operating system, SatSite embraces everything SDR stands for, and is the solution for an easy adoption of new standards or technologies, even 5G in the future.

A snapshot of SS7ware at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas

SS7ware was at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas last week – if you haven’t been around to see us, here’s a recap of the most important events.

It was great to see so many companies, including manufacturers, mobile operators, M2M platform companies, developers, service providers, gathered to discuss innovation, management, and security in the M2M and IoT ecosystem.

Through 4 days of keynote presentations, panel discussions, exhibitor booths, live demos, and case studies, we also had a lot on our plates, as you can see in the gallery below.

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CEO Diana Cionoiu was invited to take part in the ‘Carrier Aggregation for Public Transport’ panel which took place Wednesday, discussing the possibilities to create a new experience for public transportation using the bandwidth capabilities in LTE and LTE-Advanced.

SS7ware also made it to the AT&T Fast Pitch finals, where we could talk about our software-defined mobile network solution among a variety of other innovative ideas bringing IoT to both businesses and individuals. Two interviews for the TMC team for their website, and a live SatSite demo were also on our list. Everyone around the Exhibit Hall on Tuesday had the chance to watch devices connected to SatSite work seamlessly. We simply plugged it in to make a GSM phone call between the two registered devices; all in the blink of an eye.

To wrap up, thanks to the TMC team for doing an amazing job organizing the event! Here are some take-aways to keep us focused on IoT/M2M developments in the near future:

  • when it comes to connecting the home, security is of utmost importance
  • connecting ‘everything’ comes with increased responsibility and safety challenges
  • new players like Google, Amazon, or Facebook are reshaping the ecosystem
  • who does what in the new business environment

For more content, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Meet us at IoT Evolution Expo!

Here’s your chance to meet us – we’ll be at IoT Evolution Expo in Las Vegas, August 17 to 20! We’ll be there throughout the event showcasing a live product demo and we’re participating in the ‘Carrier Aggregation for Public Transport’ panel on Wednesday, August 19, starting at 2:30 pm.

Complete software-defined network for IoT coverage

During the panel, we’ll talk more about SatSite as an IoT solution for public transport. In cities, LTE is an exciting opportunity for connecting new business sectors and new activities. Devices and sensors using real-time data can provide more relevant contextual information to help make faster, better decisions. LTE IoT coverage can reshape the way we think and act towards our homes, healthcare, transportation, or security.

Our solution for connected transportation, LTE SatSite, enables deployments with lower costs, resilient infrastructure, and high capacity.

The lightweight, low-power base station can be easily installed in public access areas (such as buses or crossroads), allowing:

  • seamless 4G customer experience anytime
  • smart traffic and passenger management
  • emergency management and transport security

Join us at IoT Evolution Expo, tune in to our Youtube channel, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More about the speaker: follow Diana Cionoiu on LinkedIn.

IoT management at the network’s edge

IoT has enabled users to access control over a multitude of “smart” devices while also unlocking unlimited possibilities for operators in new markets, such as farming, utilities and transportation. A Gartner study claimed that by 2020 there will be around 26 billion IoT connected devices. Imagine the data they collect and the necessary technology required to process it.

Until recently, cloud computing was the answer for storing and processing data collections from IoT applications. However, despite being a cost-effective model in appearance, the handling data in a centralized cloud site is facing new capacity, data management and security challenges. Analysts at Gartner have also raised the alarm on the inefficiency, from both a technical and economical standpoint, of sending all of the gathered data to a single site for processing.

Fog Computing is a new technical solution that allows data to be aggregated in larger number of smaller remote data centers for the initial analysis, and only afterwards sent for storage into the cloud. The term “Fog Computing” is recent and refers to a technology that is an extension of cloud computing. It’s main characteristics are: the geographical distribution of a large number of processing nodes (application servers), its extended mobility, a low latency and location recognition, wireless access and the predominance of real-time applications.

Fog Computing is a virtualized layer between the IoT devices and the conventional data centers in the cloud, that delivers processing, networking and storage services. It is also known as edge computing, because it is usually located at the edge of the network. It allows for a new set of applications and services solely dedicated to routing, managing and analyzing IoT data, relieving data centers from processing and storing the large volume of measurements collected from IoT devices and sensors.

This is where our SDMN YateBTS-powered solution responds to the current needs of IoT data management. To deploy a fully functional Fog Computing ecosystem, operators can install scalable application servers distributed in each cell site for data analysis and monitoring, without the traffic cluttering the core network. They are geographically distributed and connect to each other to perform a “close to the ground” intermediary layer between IoT devices and the cloud, providing security, low latency and high resilience.

SatSite base stations can redirect the traffic locally to the application server, based on the IMSI specific to the device.

fog_computing

Main features:

  • geographical distribution – Fog Computing nodes in application servers are located in each cell site and cover a wide portion of the field.
  • large number of nodes – closely connected to the geographical distribution
  • real-time connectivity – all the Fog application servers communicate directly with the SatSites located in their proximity, ensuring that they interact with client devices without passing through the core network for each IP data session

Our simplified mobile network architecture allows an easy deployment of Fog platforms to deliver real-time analytics, localization services and resilient applications. It reduces the processing burden in cloud data centers without overcharging the core network, making it ideal solution for IoT networks.

Extending LTE networks the easy way

We’ve often stated that YateUCN, our unified 2G/4G core network solution, can be used to extend existing LTE networks or upgrade GSM deployments to 4G LTE. And that’s correct. In this post we will take a closer look at how that happens and why YateUCN is more profitable than current solutions for operators moving towards LTE networks.

YateUCN is designed as a unified equipment that replaces all the functions performed by separate hardware components with one software application running on commodity hardware. This has the advantages of reducing the infrastructure costs, minimizing the equipment’s time to market, and increasing network resiliency due to a simplified management of software.

Let’s look at two scenarios where YateUCN can be integrated in existing networks.

Extend 4G LTE networks

For operators looking to increase access to 4G services YateUCN is a flexible, cost-effective solution. It drastically reduces initial equipment investment, allowing them to roll out more networks in a shorter time, to better serve growing consumer needs.

This can be done easily because YateUCN integrates all the LTE-specific functions and protocols, so that it interconnects with any existing operator setup. Every hardware component in the EPC – the MME, SGW, PGW, PCRF, and PCEF – is replaced with software running on a single piece of equipment.

The MME function handles UEs trying to connect to the network. It is responsible for subscriber authentication and uses S6a interface (Diameter) to connect to the operator’s HSS. The MME is also in charge of mobility management, allowing UEs continuous connectivity and active sessions as they move through the network.

YateUCN is fully compatible with any eNodeB, using S1-AP interface to manage inter-MME handover.

The SGW function allows YateUCN to manage data traffic routing over S1-U interface, ensuring communication between the eNodeB and the PGW, which establishes and maintains the IP session. The PGW interconnects with the charging solution of the operator using Diameter and Radius interface, allowing AAA management for wireless access.

The PCRF in YateUCN maintains QoS levels and charging policies, enabling mobile operators to control bandwidth usage while their subscribers are roaming. The Policy and Control Enforcement Function, PCEF, performs policy enforcement and service data flow detection, making sure the data flow through from the PGW is accessible.

The unified nature of YateUCN leads to large equipment savings, and makes it easy to manage the network capacities with a software upgrade.

Upgrade networks to 4G LTE

2G/3G networks can be upgraded to 4G LTE using YateUCN core network and SatSite for the radio network. A new LTE network with YateUCN and YateENB SatSite significantly reduces overall network roll-out costs. SatSite operating on YateENB is an eNodeB communicating with the MME in YateUCN over S1 interface and with any other eNodeB over X2 interface.

Since YateUCN also unifies all the layers of the GSM/GPRS core alongside the EPC, it also acts as an extension of existing 2G networks, achieved at no costs for additional 2G core equipment.

SatSite can run on YateBTS and YateENB at the same time, so each cell will act as a mixed 2G/4G site. As a result, operators can choose to use SatSite in mixed 2G/4G networks, without needing a new 2G core. What’s more, since in 2G mode YateBTS SatSite unifies both the BTS and the BSC layer, it communicates directly with YateUCN core network, using the SIP/GTP protocols.

The MSC contained in YateUCN allows subscribers to be handed over from the YateUCN – SatSite network to the operator’s current 2G deployment in the case of CS services mobility. Subscribers can roam from the YateUCN/SatSite network to any existing MSC serving the roaming area to ensure voice services continuity.

YateUCN can be integrated in any system already deployed by the operator. Used together with SatSite, it serves to build complete 4G LTE or mixed 2G/LTE networks with a low infrastructure and operations investment, ensuring consumers consistent access to both voice and data services.

Rethinking redundancy: a new approach to core networks

Mobile communications must provide uninterrupted mobile service at all times, but the costs to create network redundancy with current conventional equipment are restrictive. YateUCN unified core is a profitable and flexible solution for redundancy in 2G and 4G mobile networks.

Network redundancy ensures that as technology advances, the capacity of network infrastructures to support more subscribers without blackouts adapts accordingly. YateUCN is a unified core network allowing resiliency in 2G/LTE mobile networks using YateBTS and YateENB SatSite. SatSite acts as a BTS/BSC communicating directly with the MSC/VLR/SGSN/GGSN and EPC in YateUCN.

As a software-defined core solution, YateUCN replaces the heavy, expensive core equipment used in conventional networks with smaller, affordable, and easy-to-manage equipment. It is a software implementation of 2G and LTE core network layers, operating on commodity hardware.

yucn_redund_2015-7-16_draft4.2_pic2

In typical networks, redundancy is achieved by supplying an additional core server for any given core server, causing costs to more than double, since supplementary costs for the configuration of back-up servers add up to the capital expenses.

YateUCN implements the core network functions and protocols in software, enabling any other YateUCN node to take over extra-traffic in case of failure of a node, or if the network capacity needs to be increased.

While conventional MSC/VLR in data centers are limited to serving a given number of BSCs in a defined geographical area, in a YateUCN – SatSite network the base station allows a device to connect to any YateUCN node in the network, irrespectively of the geographical location of the device/BTS and of whether the network is 2G or 4G. A list of available YateUCN units is configured in each YateBTS/YateENB SatSite.

Core equipment is usually designed to allocate specific core network functions (authentication, mobility, call setup, data routing) to separate nodes. Such equipment is heavy due to the large number of components, increases lead time, and requires separate back-up equipment for each node.

YateUCN unifies both GSM and LTE core layers, meaning that a single alternate YateUCN server provides full redundancy for any other server in the network. If a failover should occur in a YateUCN node, a device can register to a different YateUCN, remaining attached to the same base station, as shown below.

yucn_redund_2015-7-15_draft4.1

A new YateUCN is chosen from the list of YateUCN units held in the base station. If a mobile device remains connected to the same BTS, registration to the MSC/VLR in the new YateUCN is performed whenever the device communicates with the network to perform an action. Registration to the new YateUCN is updated in the HSS/HLR.

If the device roams to an area served by a different BTS, they will connect to the new SatSite, but will remain connected to the YateUCN currently serving it, and a new query in the HLR is not required. This reduces the load on the HLR and allows it to support a higher subscriber capacity. This can be seen below:

MS connecting to a new YateUCN

MS connecting to a new YateUCN

Increasing traffic to a YateUCN core server is easily performed because YateUCN communicates with 2G base stations using SIP and GTP, and with eNodeBs over SIP/S1AP/GTP. SIP and GTP signalling protocols have the advantage of scalability and interoperability, allowing different service requirements to be served at the same time and with the same quality standards.

Because YateUCN uses commodity hardware, operation and servicing can be managed remotely, with minimal external support, significantly driving operational costs down. YateUCN provides simplicity and cost-effectiveness to building redundancy in mobile networks so that operators can provide high-quality service at all times.