SS7ware’s insights from the MVNOs World Congress

VNOs World Congress 2017 (1)

We just got back from the MVNOs World Congress, in Nice, where we did quite a good impression with our YateHSS/HLR and YateUCN solutions for MVNOs. The “not so shocking” conclusion that we came to was that our public pricing policy impacts the MVNO market at its core.

We already knew that, so the real benefit of the conference for us was that we got closer to the needs of our customers by talking to them about their troubles as MVNOs, MNOs and IoT MVNOs.

We share the knowledge, so here are some of the insights:

1. MVNOs need our network equipment (YateUCN as a GMSC, GGSN, PGW and YateHSS/HLR) because of the flexibility given by the features included in the Yate software and the use of off-the-shelf hardware.

In the case of the YateUCN (unified core network) the Yate software implements the functionalities of 2G/3G/4G core networks in a single server. We made it that flexible in order to ease the businesses of MVNOs and MNOs as well. YateUCN works for MNOs as MSC/VLR, SGSN, SGW.

2. full MVNOs choose our products because their businesses aren’t sustainable on the long run with big vendors’ products (such as Cisco, Huawei) that ask 4 times the costs of an YateHSS/HLR for an upgrade.

As the network grows, the CAPEX and OPEX expenditures/subscriber decreases significantly with our MVNO solutions. We charge per license and once your network grows in number of subscribers, you just add another server in a cluster. The YateUCN and YateHSS/HLR solutions are scalable, redundant and load-balanced due to the clustering module implemented in the Yate software.

3. the IoT MVNOs use our GGSN/ PGW solution (YateUCN) to offer mobility to the IoT devices and a positive return on investment for the MVNO business, within 6 months or less.
SS7ware’s full IoT MVNO network solution consists of two products, YateUCN and YateHSS/HLR, both with license costs at $31050, which is about $0.62/ device for a network of 100.000 devices.

4. the strategy of MNOs is to officially sustain MVNOs businesses, because MVNOs play well on the segmented markets and by doing this, they take market shares from competition.

Please feel free to send us questions at sales@ss7ware.com or visit our website, http://www.yatebts.com, to learn more about SS7ware’s MVNO solutions.

Hope to see you in November at the MVNO Conference in London.

SS7ware Inc.
Contact
0040-726-183-753
www.yatebts.com

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YateHSS/HLR breaks the barriers to entry into the MVNO and IoT markets

YateHSS/HLR delivers failover cluster, load-balancing and scalability features inside a cluster at an affordable price, breaking the barriers to entry the market for MVNOs and IoT products manufacturers, leading to a positive ROI from an early stage of the business.

clustering_blogpost_y-hss-hlr_serverDell PowerEdge430 server – off-the-shelf hardware for the YateHSS/HLR

The YateHSS/HLR was designed to be flexible over time, safe for the mobile operators and IoT businesses and with low CapEx and OpEx requirements.

  • It’s flexible over time because YateHSS/HLR uses off-the-shelf hardware (Dell servers) and runs on Linux OS; in time you can upgrade the software or change the hardware at a low OpEx.
  • It’s safe because our network database solution is organized into clusters of equal YateHSS/HLR servers, load-balanced, easy to scale and redundant.
  • We practice transparency for the price of our products, see for yourself. At this price, the YateHSS/HLR solution significantly lowers the barriers to entry a new market and the CapEx of the business.
  • The cluster solution includes the YateMMI management web-interface, a JSON API for configuration and setting up services and SIM profiles, and an HTTP hook to access your own web tools or platforms.
  • YateHSS/HLR supports the following profiles: Wi-Fi, EPC, IMS, CS, PS.
clustering_blogpost_clustering Cluster architecture of the YateHSS/HLR solution

We created the solution to be affordable and to have all the features for network stability. One server supports approximately 100.000 subscribers. For small networks, the investment is as low as $1/ subscriber and for large networks of less than $0.50/ subscriber.

Stability comes from the cluster’s load-balancing feature. Subscribers’ services are distributed between the nodes in the cluster and millions of operations can take place at the same time without the risk of capacity failure.

Stability also derives from a failover cluster feature implemented in the YateHSS/HLR solution. The network services take place in a single node (one YateHSS/HLR server) of the cluster, but each node replicates the events to the other nodes. All nodes have the same replicated information and if a node breaks, another one takes its load automatically.

clustering_blogpost_failover Failover cluster feature of the YateHSS/HLR solution

Our solution’s flexibility comes with a big advantage: the simplicity of scaling up in case your network grows. Adding a new node to the cluster is a process that takes less than one hour.

clustering_blogpost_new_nodeScalability feature of the YateHSS/HLR cluster solution

There isn’t any maximum limit of how many HSS/HLRs clusters to deploy in a network. If you need to understand the technical details behind the cluster, please take a closer look to our documentation regarding the YateHSS/HLR cluster architecture.

A few final words…

Think about the project that is technically and financially sustainable with YateHSS/HLR. The YateHSS/HLR solution allows millions of IoT devices to connect and makes a wide variety of applications possible for final users.

We recommend the YateHSS/HLR as an excellent choice for MVNOs and IoT manufacturers entering a market, for its features and for the return on investment advantage in terms of business.

 

Busy 2016 for Yate SDMN products

Stepping into 2016, we have exciting news.

Through 2015 we continued to develop the GSM/GPRS SatSite base station, as well as our main core network products: the 2G/2.5G/4G YateUCN core network and the 2G/3G/4G YateHSS/HLR.

We start 2016 with the release of the LTE SatSite Model 142, with software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation, generating 10-20 Watts LTE power output with a power consumption of only 65-80 Watts. We also prepared new features and updates for YateHSS/HLR after receiving relevant feedback from our customers. And there is the new YateBTS website, which now offers extensive information on our products, solutions and our technology.

SatSite Model 142 launch

The LTE SatSite Model 142 delivers software-selectable LTE or GSM/GPRS operation from the same base station.

LTE_SatSite_142

In both LTE and GSM/GPRS modes, the SatSite Model 142 generates a higher output power than the previous model. As an eNodeB, the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts, at bandwidths of 1.4 to 20 MHz, while in GSM/GPRS mode the SatSite operates at up to 20 Watts for 1-TRX or 2 Watts/TRX in multi-TRX configuration (at up to 4-TRX). The SatSite weighs only 5kg and has a low enough power consumption that it can be easily powered by solar panels in most of the world.

Its required backhaul is under 100 Mbit, resulting from the fact that, unlike many LTE solutions, the SatSite is a unified LTE eNodeB, and not a remote radio head (RRH) that needs a separate baseband unit (BBU).

For more information about Model 142’s complete specifications, please check the datasheet.

YateHSS/HLR new features

On the core network side, we start 2016 with new features to the YateHSS/HLR: scalability (cluster configuration), multi-IMSI support and support for separate circuit-switched/packet-switched network profiles.

Cluster configuration allows YateHSS/HLR nodes to work in a cloud to provide scalability. YateHSS/HLR servers all provide the same service and handle the same subscribers. If a server fails, the subscribers are distributed to the other YateHSS/HLR nodes in the cluster, which continues to provide the same services.

Multi-IMSI support allows YateHSS/HLR to respond to an alternative IMSI from the same SIM card, in different roaming scenarios. The feature sends an HTTP request to the operator’s server after the subscriber tries to roam into a new network. The operator’s server uses the request to trigger an IMSI change in the SIM using an OTA mechanism. The SIM carries a multi-IMSI application that ensures that the SIM will return to the main IMSI if it cannot register with the alternative IMSI.

The support for separate CS/PS profiles means that subscribers’ profiles are grouped according to the types of services associated to them, allowing the profiles to be easily updated to provide new services. For example, a subscriber might have “Prepaid voice, roaming”, “Prepaid data 1Mbps, not roaming” and “LTE not allowed” settings. It is easy to change one service of a subscriber by simply selecting another profile.

A few final words…

We have entered 2016 with great new core network features and new RAN product releases, making new opportunities for operators. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Facebook to find out first about our new  announcements and releases.

 

Cable operators becoming MVNO: a win-win scenario

In our previous blog post we opened up the discussion about cable companies staying relevant in a day and time where the subscriber trend is to become more mobile, at the expense of home-based data consumption. As a 2014 report from Adobe already showed, more than 50% of browsing on smartphones and 93% of browsing on tablet comes from WiFi.

Even as they expand their offer, cable providers still see usage limited to home or office hours. On their side, mobile operators continue to upgrade their networks to 4G (and future 5G) technology to deliver more high-quality media content; this makes them competitive in terms of service quality but also results in rising infrastructure investment.

In this post we’ll see how cable companies and MNO can start providing data services using a shared infrastructure, with YateHSS/HLR and the YateUCN unified core.

Mobile data offloading can be an opportunity for both operators and cable companies to provide data access to more users without incurring large expenses. Offloading enables operators to reduce the traffic load on their networks and reallocate bandwidth to other users in case of congestion, by assigning part of the traffic to a WiFi network. For cable companies, it becomes possible to serve subscribers in-between existing hotspots, making them rely primarily on the WiFi network, rather than on the cellular one.

YateUCN and YateHSS/HLR in a cable operator setup

This can be done through MVNO agreements between cable operators and one or multiple MNO, so that the cable provider would share the network assets of the operator to provide carrier-class WiFi access.

As MVNO, a cable company will provide its own SIMs, and its customers will register to and receive data traffic from the MNO’s network. Though some MVNO may choose to also operate their own core network, they are usually likely to hold control over billing, subscriber management and policy control functions, in which case they will only deploy an HLR and/or HSS. In fact, reports suggest that it is preferable for MVNO who offer triple or quad-play operating to deploy their own HSS/HLR (to which they can integrate policy control and AAA), because they need to provide a ‘consistent treatment of the user’ across terminals and technologies.

Providing ubiquitous data access between 2G/3G/4G cellular networks and WiFi hotspots requires offloading to be done seamlessly. Most mobile devices today attempt to connect automatically to an available WiFi network, which they will remember after the first connection has been performed. To connect, once the device has detected the SSID, it proceeds to authentication, which must be done instantly and securely.

In a network using the YateUCN core and the YateHSS/HLR, acting as a typical Home Subscriber Server/Home Location Register with an integrated AuC, SIM authentication is performed between the device and the Access Point, enabling the subscriber a one-time registration to the network using the IMSI stored in their SIM and the secure encryption key Ki. YateHSS/HLR and YateUCN support EAP-SIM/EAP-AKA authentication specified in the IETF standard for WiFi inter-working, securing the connection on both user and network ends.

Once the device is known to the core network, YateUCN communicates with the AuC in the YateHSS/HLR using the SS7 or Diameter protocol, depending on the type of services the user has access to. As soon as the SIM is authenticated, the HSS/HLR takes over and manages the SIM and its services.

YateHSS/HLR supports all the interfaces needed to communicate with the SGSN, EPC, and IMS at the same time, and provides advanced subscriber management options. As a combined HSS/HLR, it allows a subscriber to be located in simultaneous networks if, for example, they are registered to 4G LTE and paging for a CS service is required.

Of course, there are also challenges for cable providers who redefine themselves as WiFi access operators. One of the main concerns is related to the use of non-SIM devices such as laptops, which, even if able to authenticate to the AP in the same way as SIM devices, have no way to then connect to a core network.

While such aspects still need to be approached, the possibility of ‘WiFi-first’ networks seems a venture worthwhile for cable companies.